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Posts Tagged ‘children’

“The nation is going backwards on insuring kids and it is likely to get worse,” says Joan Alker, co-author of the study and executive director of Georgetown’s Center for Children and Families. Alker and other advocates for children’s health place the blame for this change on the Trump administration and the Republican-controlled Congress, saying the Republican policies and actions have cast a pall on enrollment in health plans.The number of children in the United States without coverage rose to 3.9 million in 2017 from about 3.6 million a year earlier, according to census data analyzed by Alker’s Georgetown team.

Source: Under Trump, Number Of Uninsured Kids Rose For First Time This Decade : Shots – Health News : NPR

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A rare but devastating polio-like virus appears to have made itself at home in the United States, partially paralyzing hundreds of children.There have been 127 cases reported in 22 states so far this year, with 62 confirmed as acute flaccid myelitis, said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, head of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She announced the numbers in a Tuesday media briefing.This year’s outbreak marks the third wave of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) to hit the United States since 2014, and this wave is on track to be the worst yet, experts say.

Source: CDC Warns of Polio-Like Virus Striking More U.S. Kids

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New research by professors at Brigham Young University revealed that parental warmth cannot neutralize the consequences of helicopter parenting. Additionally, a lack of warmth makes the negative effects worse.

Such negative effects include lower self-worth and higher risk behavior, such as binge drinking.

“From our past work, we thought there might be something positive about helicopter parenting under certain conditions, but we’re just not finding it,” study author Larry Nelson said.

The study, published in Emerging Adulthood, is a follow-up to 2012 research on helicopter parenting that found the children of helicopter parents are less engaged in school. Now they’ve found that helicopter parenting combined with an absence of parental warmth is especially detrimental to young adults’ well-being.

Researchers defined helicopter parenting as parents’ over-involvement in the lives of their children. This includes making important decisions for them, solving their problems and intervening in their children’s conflicts. Warmth is measured by parental availability to talk and spend time together.

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via Extra love and support doesn’t make up for being a helicopter parent — ScienceDaily.

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I know so many parents who agonized over this decision for their summer born children, especially if the child was a boy. This from the Journal of Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.

Delaying the start of school for a year for children with summer birthdays or those born prematurely may lead to worse academic performance later, new British research suggests."Our study shows that delaying school entry has no effect on Year 1 teacher ratings of academic performance. But it is associated with poorer performance in age-standardized tests of reading, writing, mathematics and attention as the children get older," the study’s corresponding author, Professor Dieter Wolke, from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick, said in a university news release.Due to the study’s design, the researchers can’t say that delaying the start of school was what caused poorer performance later, only that there was a link between these factors.The study was published recently in the Journal of Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.

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WEDNESDAY, April 3 (HealthDay News) — Melanoma, the most deadly form of skin cancer, doesn’t usually occur in kids, but a new study shows that it’s happening more often.

While melanoma in children is still extremely rare, the rate increased by about 2melanoma percent per year from 1973 to 2009 among U.S children from newborns to age 19. Melanoma accounts for up to 3 percent of all pediatric cancers, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation.

According to the study, 1,317 children were diagnosed with melanoma during the study time frame. Of these, 1,230 children were white. Because the number of melanoma cases among other racial and ethnic groups was so small, researchers focused the analysis on white children.

The biggest jump in melanoma rates was seen among adolescents aged 15 to 19, especially girls, the study showed.

The new findings were published in the May print issue of Pediatrics.

via http://consumer.healthday.com/Article.asp?AID=675015

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